Friday, October 19, 2018

An apple for the Teacher



The gifting of fruit is associated with hardship in world history. In Denmark and Sweden during the 1700s, families gave baskets of apples as payment for the education of their children. Apples have become symbols associated with schools all over the world and most of us are familiar with the phrase that I have deliberately chosen to share my apples with teacher readers in the hope that they will provide some compensation for the hard work that goes into the job of teaching.


A handful of websites worth visiting…
This link takes you to an infographic with links to 32 sites.
This link is to a number of tools that are great for building STEAM projects  Science/Technology/Engineering/Art/Maths






Professional Reading.
Resources/ links to publications and research plus a link to a YouTube channel.
The importance of mindfulness: An article by Stephanie Tolan that discusses how a highly gifted child’s different intensity and cognitive ability affects life experiences.







Podcasts
TED talks are a wonderful source of inspiration. Check out these amazing talks by children and bookmark the TED blog site. Well worth the time!
A link to 10 podcasts about subjects lending themselves to STEAM  investigations. Great for kids to listen to.
Science/Technology/Engineering/Art/Maths









Learn to differentiate.
Differentiation is giving students choice to add depth to the learning and includes the provision of  resources to match levels of understanding.
Here is a link to help out with ideas:
And many of the activities for sale on my teacherspayteacherswebsite:






Educational ideas for the classroom 
Click FOLLOW while you are there and keep up to date with new offerings.













Survival Strategies for when the going gets tough
Make a list of things to be done then categorise (chunk) them, check them off as each group is completed and give yourself a little reward.
Celebrate learning success with a powerful way to end the school year:
60 more ways to survive as your teaching year ends.

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